Sheriff, Former MSA Site Coordinator Appointed to POST Commission

On June 19 Governor Mike Parson announced six appointments to various boards and commissions. Two – Gary Hill and Sheriff David Marshak  – were appointed to serve on the Peace Officer Standards and Training Program (POST) Commissio​n​.

Hill, of Holts Summit, currently serves as the chief of police and director of public safety at Lincoln University. Previously, he served with the Cole County Sheriff’s Department for 18 years, beginning ​​as a deputy sheriff and advancing to Patrol Division Commander.

Hill has also served as a site coordinator for the Missouri Sheriffs’ Association Training Academy, adjunct instructor at Lincoln University, Joint Terrorism Task Force officer for the F.B.I., and panel member for the Missouri Police Chiefs Association’s Assessment Center. 

He is also a member of the F.B.I. National Academy Associates, Missouri Police Chiefs Association, Missouri Task Force on Children’s Justice, and Jefferson City Crime Stoppers. 

Hill is active in his community, serving as a member of the Jefferson City Lions Club, Capital City Boys and Girls Club, and the Disciples of Christ Youth Outreach Program. He holds a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice from Lincoln University and a Master of Science in criminal justice administration from Columbia College. Hill is also a graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy.

Sheriff Dave Marshak, of Festus, has served as the sheriff of Jefferson County since 2016. Previously, he served 22 years with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, beginning as a deputy sheriff and advancing to captain. In this role, he was responsible for training employees and ensuring their compliance with governing standards.

Sheriff Marshak has trained both civilians and law enforcement officers from local, state, and federal agencies. He has also served as an adjunct instructor at Jefferson College, teaching courses in criminal investigations and corrections. Sheriff Marshak holds a Bachelor of Arts in human resources and a Master of Arts in communications from Lindenwood University.

POST is a regulatory program with responsibility for licensing peace officers, ensuring compliance with peace officer continuing education requirements, and conducting investigations for disciplining the licenses of peace officers as specified by Chapter 590, RSMo.

The POST Program also licenses law enforcement basic training centers, basic training instructors, approves law enforcement training curricula, and provides staff support for the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Commission.

Sheriff to be Commemorated With Apparel Fundraiser

​’​Hold the Line’ campaign to feature special apparel in honor of Sheriff Andy Clark of DeKalb County.

A sheriff killed in a crash in DeKalb County, Missouri this week will be remembered with a charitable fundraiser for his family.

Shield Republic Charities will run a “Hold the Line” apparel campaign to raise funds for Sheriff Andy Clark of the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office, who died in a car accident while responding to a call the morning of Wednesday, June 3. The fundraiser will include commemorative t-shirts, long-sleeved shirts, hoodies, ladies’ tank tops and decals made in America. All net proceeds from the campaign will be donated to the Clark family.

Sheriff Clark died while on duty after being called to assist a deputy near Highways 36 and MO 33 near Osborn, Missouri. En route to helping his colleague, his car collided with an SUV, fatally wounding the sheriff and injuring four people in the SUV.

The cause of the crash is currently being investigated; witnesses said Sheriff Clark’s vehicle had its hazard lights on as he crashed.

“Today we share in the heartbreak of the Clark family along with the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office team,” said Charlie Romero, spokesperson for Shield Republic. “Our Hold the Line campaign in Sheriff Clark’s honor recognizes the sacrifice of a committed officer who laid down his life in the line of duty. We commend him for his service.”

View the Hold the Line fundraiser page for Sheriff Clark  at https://www.shieldrepublic.com/products/100-donation-hold-the-line-sheriff-andy-clark.

Shield Republic’s Hold the Line fundraisers have donated more than $200,000 this year to the families and units of fallen first responders, police officers and K9 police dogs.

For more information about the Shield Republic Charities, email charities@shieldrepublic.com.

About Shield Republic

Established in 2016, Shield Republic is an American lifestyle brand based outside Raleigh, North Carolina. The company offers creative, fresh apparel and merchandise embody​​ing American pride. Everything sold by Shield Republic is designed and manufactured in the United States. Shield Republic appeals to patriotic Americans p​​assionate about personal strength, second amendment rights and military strength. Through Shield Republic Charities, the company shows appreciation to soldiers, first responders and their families.

Learn more about Shield Republic and shop the online store at https://www.shieldrepublic.com.  Read the Shield Republic lifestyle blog at https://patriot.shieldrepublic.com. Follow Shield Republic on Facebook (@ShieldRepublicCo), Instagram (@shield_republic), Twitter (@shieldrepublic) and Pinterest (@shield_republic).

Guruobserver.com

Flags to Fly Half-Staff in Honor of DeKalb County Sheriff Andy Clark

Today, Governor Mike Parson ordered U.S. and Missouri flags be flown at half-staff at government buildings in DeKalb County on Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in honor of DeKalb County Sheriff Andy Clark.

On June 3, Sheriff Clark was killed in a​​ motor vehicle crash while carrying out his duties and responding to assist a deputy on an emergency call.

“Sheriff Clark devoted more than 23 years of his life as a law enforcement officer committed to protecting his fellow citizens and making his community stronger,” Governor Parson said. “He served Missouri with heart and grit, and his final act of public service was responding to assist one of his deputy sheriffs at an emergency scene. Sheriff Clark’s career is an example of public service of the highest order.”

The flags will be held at half-staff on the day Sheriff Clark is laid to rest. To view the proclamation, click here.

BJA Medal of Valor Nominations Now Being Accepted

The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) is now accepting nominations for the 2019-2020 Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor.

Every day, public safety officers risk their lives to protect America’s citizens and communities. To honor that commitment, Congress passed The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Act of 2001, which created the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor, the highest national award for valor by a public safety officer.

The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor is awarded, by the president or vice president of the United States, to a public safety officer who has exhibited exceptional courage, extraordinary decisiveness and presence of mind, and unusual swiftness of action, regardless of his or her own personal safety, in the attempt to save or protect human life.

For the purpose of this award, a public safety officer is defined as a person serving a public agency, with or without compensation, as a firefighter, law enforcement officer, or emergency services officer. The term “law enforcement officer” includes a person who is a corrections or court officer or a civil defense officer.

Eligibility for the 2019-2020 Medal of Valor is limited to incidents that take place between June 1, 2019 and May 31, 2020. Nominations will be accepted from May 29, 2020 until July 31, 2020.

Visit the Medal of Valor site to learn more and to submit a nomination.

Fallen Law Enforcement Officers to be Honored During Virtual Candlelight Vigil on May 13

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial is centered in the 400 block of E Street, NW, Washington, DC and is the nation’s monument to law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Dedicated on October 15, 1991, the Memorial honors federal, state and local law enforcement officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the safety and protection of our nation and its people.

 

The names of fallen U.S. law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty will be formally dedicated on the walls of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial during a virtual Candlelight Vigil on Wednesday, May 13, 2020.

Traditionally held on the National Mall with more than 30,000 first responders, surviving families and law enforcement supporters in attendance, special remarks and the names of each of the men and women who died in the line of duty during 2019 will be read aloud during the virtual Candlelight Vigil, which will be live streamed. The names of fallen law enforcement officers who died earlier in history, but whose sacrifice had not been previously documented, will also be read during this time.

“The current crisis that our nation and the world is facing has resulted in the cancellation of public gatherings in DC during National Police Week 2020,” said National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund CEO Marcia Ferranto. “We will not let this crisis deter us from honoring the fallen. We plan to march forward in solidarity with a virtual Candlelight Vigil and the reading of the names that can be watched from anywhere in the world. Then, as the future becomes more certain and the end of the crisis is near, we will begin to make plans for an in-person reading of names to honor our fallen officers.”

Located in Washington, DC, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial is a living monument to ensure the men and women who died in the line of duty will never be forgotten. The names engraved on the Memorial’s walls represent fallen officers from all 50 states, the District of Columbia,  U.S. territories, federal law enforcement, and military police agencies.

HISTORY

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as Police Week. Currently, tens of thousands of law enforcement officers from around the world converge on Washington, DC to participate in a number of planned events which honor those that have paid the ultimate sacrifice.

The Memorial Service began in 1982 as a gathering in Senate Park of approximately 120 survivors and supporters of law enforcement. Decades later, the event, more commonly known as National Police Week, has grown to a series of events which attracts thousands of survivors and law enforcement officers to our Nation’s Capital each year.

The National Peace Officers Memorial Service, which is sponsored by the Grand Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police, is one in a series of events which includes the Candlelight Vigil, which is sponsored by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) and seminars sponsored by Concerns of Police Survivors (C.O.P.S.)

National Police Week draws in between 25,000 to 40,000 attendees. The attendees come from departments throughout the United States as well as from agencies throughout the world. This provides a unique opportunity to meet others who work in law enforcement. In that spirit, the Fraternal Order of Police DC Lodge #1 sponsors receptions each afternoon and evening during Police Week. These events are open to all law enforcement personnel and are an experience unlike any other.

Watch recorded coverage of the 2019 Memorial Service at the U.S. capitol by clicking on this link.

Department of Public Safety Deputy Director Retires

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 1, 2020

 

With today’s official retirement of Department of Public Safety Deputy Director Kenny Jones, local communities lose a true champion and supporter of local issues.

From 1985 to 2004 Jones served his community well as Moniteau County sheriff. In 2005 he continued his service to local communities when he was elected to the Missouri House of Representatives from District 117.

While in the House, Jones pushed for legislation to benefit local school districts, as well as legislation to provide better benefits for veterans who became state employees. He sponsored and was instrumental in passing legislation to pay local sheriffs’ deputies a living wage. Thanks to his dedication and hard work, today more than 350 local law enforcement families are no longer needing some type of public assistance.

During his time as deputy director, Jones consistently held the needs of local communities at the forefront – ensuring their needs were looked after – whether though funding, allocation of resources or simply through open communication.

Communities need representation from someone with local roots, a track record of serving at the local level, and a dedication to local communities.  As Jones moves into future endeavors, we encourage leadership to seek a replacement with qualities such as he brought to the department.

We wish Kenny Jones all the best in retirement. He will be missed.

 

Kevin Merritt
Executive Director

 

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Governor Orders Capitol Dome to Shine Blue in Honor of Fallen Law Enforcement Officers

In honor of Missouri’s law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty, Governor Mike Parson has ordered the Missouri State Capitol dome and the Law Enforcement Memorial to be lit blue through Sunday night, May 3.

This year, organizers of the annual Missouri Law Enforcement Candlelight Vigil and Memorial Service are not able to hold the traditional ceremonies because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Members of the Missouri Law Enforcement Memorial Board organized a small ceremony at the Law Enforcement Memorial on the north side of the Capitol on Thursday evening, April 30. Photog​​raphs of the ceremony and the Capitol lighted in blue last night are available for use at this Flickr album link.  

“Each year, the Missouri Law Enforcement Memorial ceremonies bring comfort and strength to this state’s law enforcement community as they gather to remember our brave fallen,” Governor Parson said. “While we will miss the ceremonies this May, I have ordered the Capitol and the law enforcement memorial to shine blue to honor all of our law enforcement heroes who have paid the ultimate price. They will never be forgotten.”    

“For the last 25 years, we have gathered at the memorial to find strength, solace and support from our Missouri law enforcement community,” Missouri Public Safety Director Sandy Karsten said. “This year, attendance at our commemoration was forced to be smaller than in the past, but our appreciation of the sacrifices of our fallen comrades, and the strength of their survivors is not diminished. We will always remember those who lay down their lives for their fellow citizens.”

This year, two names were added to the memorial’s Wall of Honor for those who died in the line of duty:

Wayne M. Niedenberg – On June 6, 2019, Lakeshire Police Department Chief Wayne M. Niedenberg was en route to his home when he came across a rollover crash. He radioed for assistance and provided aid to the crash victims. He then suffered a fatal heart attack after arriving at his home.

Michael V. Langsdorf – On June 23, 2019, North County Police Cooperative Officer Michael V. Langsdorf responded to investigate a call about a man attempting to pass a bad check at a Wellston business. During a struggle, the man pulled a handgun from his waistband and fatally shot Officer Langsdorf.

Former Crawford County Sheriff Dies

Former Crawford County Sheriff Albert “Al” Charles Engelbrecht, Jr., of Steelville, died on Wednesday, April 8. He served as sheriff for a total of 16 years from 1985​ to ​1988 and​ again​ from 1993​ to ​2004.

He was a graduate of the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Academy​, working eight years as a St. Louis city policeman. ​During that time, he and his wife Alice purchased land in Crawford County for their retirement. However, they decided to move sooner than planned, so in 1976 Crawford County became their new home. After living there for a few years, he ran for sheriff and was elected.
 
Engelbrecht died at the age of 79. He is survived by his wife, Alice, and two children.
A post on the Crawford County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page on the date of his death offered condolences to ​​his family and stated, “We ask for comfort to be given to his family and offer our appreciation of his dedicated service to this community and the citizens of Crawford County. Rest In Peace Sheriff, we have the watch from here.”
 
​The former sheriff was a member of St. Michael’s Catholic Church, the Knights of Columbus with a 4th degree, the Missouri Sheriff’s Association, the National Sheriff’s Association, the Crawford County Republicans and was a lifetime member of the National Rifle Association (NRA).
 
Funeral services were held on Wednesday, April 15.

The Stories of 14 Officers Lost in January

The last few weeks have been difficult all of us in the law enforcement community, as friends, families and co-workers mourn the loss of multiple public servants. 

Within the first month of 2020, we’ve lost a total of fourteen police officers who have passed away.   And not surprisingly, the media hasn’t had much to say about it.

Today, we take the time to honor these heroes for giving their lives for something greater.



Deputy Sheriff Sheldon Gordon Whiteman

Deputy Gordan from the Long County Sheriff’s Office in Georgia was killed while engaged in a high-speed pursuit on Thursday, January 23rd.

While only having been with the department for four months, he had previously served with the Chatham County Sheriff’s Office for four years.

Sadly, he leaves behind his wife, three children, and his father.


Police Officer Katherine Mary Thyne

Officer Thyne from the Newport News Police Department in Virginia tragically died on Thursday, January 23rd after being dragged by a vehicle for over a block.

She and her partner were investigating reports of drug activity, when they approached a vehicle on 1400 block of 16th Street.

The driver sped off, causing the officer to be dragged, and the driver crashed into a tree which pinned the officer between the vehicle and tree.

The young officer had only been on the force for a year and leaves behind her 2-year-old daughter, fiancée, mother, three brothers, and grandparents.

 

Major Angelanette Moore

Major Moore of the Virginia Peninsula Regional Jail in Virginia passed away on Thursday, January 23rd.

After serving in the jail for 20 years, she collapsed while on duty from a heart attack. Despite officers and medical staff immediately administering CPR, she could not be resuscitated.

She is survived by her husband and son.


Officer Tiffany-Victoria Bilon Enriquez & Officer Kaulike Kalama

Officer Enriquez and Officer Kalama of the Honolulu Police Department in Hawaii died on Sunday, January 19th after responding to a stabbing call at a home.

Officer Enriquez was one of the first officers who arrived at the scene to help the stabbing victim. When she approached the house where the suspect was located, she was gunned down.

She was an Air Force Reserves Veteran and served the department for seven years.

Officer Kalama later responded to the residence after Officer Enriquez was shot, and he was also shot by the suspect inside the home.

Officer Kalama had served the department for nine years and leaves behind his wife and son. Officer Enriquez is survived by three daughters and one grandson.

 
Deputy Sheriff Jarid Taylor

Deputy Taylor of the Bryan County Sheriff’s Office in Oklahoma died in a vehicular crash on Tuesday, January 14th while responding to an emergency call.

He had been with the Sheriff’s office for just under two years and is survived by his two children and fiancée.


Detective Amber Joy Leist

Detective Leist of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department in California passed away on Sunday, January 12th after she was struck by an oncoming vehicle after helping an elderly woman who fell in the roadway.

While off-duty, she managed to help the woman safely across the intersection, but was struck while returning to her car.

She served with the department for twelve years and is survived by her two sons.


Police Officer Nicholas Reyna

Officer Reyna of the Lubbock Police Department in Texas was killed by another vehicle while tending to a single-car rollover on Saturday, January 11th.

Lieutenant Eric Hill of the Lubbock Fire Department was killed as a result as well. Officer Reyna had only been on the force for a year before he passed.


Police Officer Paul Dunn

Officer Dunn of the Lakeland Police Department in Florida had died as a result of crashing his motorcycle on Thursday, January 9th.

He was heading back to the police station on his department motorcycle when he struck a raised median of the roadway, causing him to be thrown from the bike.

The Marine Corps veteran had served with Lakeland Police Department for six years and had previously served with the Polk County Sheriff’s Office for 12 years. He leaves behind his wife, three children, and two stepdaughters.


Public Safety Officer Jackson Ryan Winkeler

Officer Winkeler of the Florence Regional Airport Department of Public Safety in South Carolina was shot and killed while conducting a traffic stop Sunday, January 5th.

Officer Winkeler also served as a volunteer firefighter with the Latta Fire Department prior to his passing.

He is survived by both his parents and his sisters.


Investigator Ryan D. Fortini

Officer Fortini of the New York State Police passed away from cancer on Wednesday, January 1st.

He had served the department for 16 years before retiring in 2015, and his cancer had stemmed from his assignment to the search and recovery efforts at the World Trade Center site following the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Officer Fortini is survived by his fiancee, parents, brother, and sister.


Officer Munir “Mo” Edais

Officer Munir “Mo” Edais of the Los Gatos-Monte Sereno Police Department died unexpectedly on January 21st.

The circumstances of the officer’s death were never revealed, but he’d served with the department for 10 years and leaves behind his 2 children and one child on the way.


Investigator John Cole Haynie

Investigator John Cole Haynie of the Rockdale County Sheriff’s Office in Georgia died on Saturday, January 25th after a month-long battle with the flu.

He had served the sheriff’s office for 8 years prior to his passing. He is survived by his wife.

​​
Officer Cesar Ramirez

Officer Ramirez of the Norwalk Police Department in Connecticut passed away on January 28th after battling brain cancer.

He had served the department for 32 years prior to passing and was celebrated by his community and Norwalk Mayor Harry Rilling named December 13th as “Cesar Ramirez Day” in his honor.
 
​By Gregory Hoyt | Law Enforcement Today  lawenforcementtoday.com​​