Register for Promoting Wellness and Resiliency in Correctional Staff Webinar

Do you want to see what some of the latest data and promising practices are revealing about staff wellness for corrections officers and staff? Would you like to learn how to apply a holistic approach to your workplace along the continuum of preventive to reactive responses?

If you answered “Yes” to either of these questions, plan to participate in the one-hour-long Promoting Wellness and Resiliency in Correctional Staff Webinar, set for ​1 p.m. February 2.

Correctional staff face significant stress and challenges in maintaining wellness and resiliency in the workplace. There is emerging evidence that effective strategies and programs exist; however, they often occur in a piecemeal or sporadic fashion. This webinar provides academic insight into the current research on officer wellness and references emerging areas of innovative practices.

It includes practitioner expertise on valuable resources and support for correctional officers and staff. We will move from preventive to reactive strategies and build on new approaches to increase resiliency.

Participants will learn what research and practice tell us about the short and long-term effects that working in corrections can have and how to promote staff wellness and manage trauma in response to what they experience.

Learning Objectives : During this one-hour interactive webinar, participants will

1) develop an understanding of the current research on correctional staff wellness and resiliency,

2) learn how to apply a holistic approach to their workplace, and

3) gain knowledge on promising real-world practices that can assist and promote both wellness and resiliency.

Speakers

Dr. Hayden Smith is an Associate Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice at the University of South Carolina. His principal focus of study is the intersection of the criminal justice and public health systems. Core areas include self-injurious and suicidal behaviors in incarcerated populations, physical and mental health needs in correctional settings, jail diversion, reentry initiatives, and correctional staff well-being and safety. Dr. Smith has expertise in program evaluation and policy analysis and has worked with numerous correctional and health systems.

Ms. Karin Ho is the Director for Victim Services with the South Carolina Department of Corrections. She has more than 30 years of victim advocacy experience and over 25 years in corrections. Recognizing how correctional staff were affected by traumatic events, she implemented the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Peer Team and Post Critical Incident Seminars for employees with ongoing trauma-related issues. As part of the CISM Team, Karin is the handler for a specially trained trauma dog who responds to correctional staff throughout the state.

The presenters have engaged in several academic-practitioner partnerships that address correctional officer and staff well-being.

Who Should Attend ?

Any employee of a state, federal or local correctional jurisdiction.

How Do I Register ?

Follow this link to register in NIC’s WebEx Event Center: 
https://nicmeetings.webex.com/nicmeetings/onstage/g.php?MTID=e0f972cfffb0d108afe22ad03ebacadfc

For content and technical information, contact Scott W. Richards, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Prison’s Division at s1richards@bop.gov

How Do I Participate Effectively In a WebEx Event Center Webinar? How Do I Get Ready ?

  • For the best experience in your next NIC WebEx Event Center webinar, you’ll need a hands-free telephone, headset or earbuds, and an internet-enabled computer.
  • For optimum learning, be in a quiet place, free from distractions/interruptions, sight-and-sound separated from others, where you can concentrate on what is happening during the webinar. A separate office space with a door to close is an ideal setting.
  • Connect to the webinar audio bridge via a hands-free telephone, using earbuds/headset connected to your phone/cell phone, so your hands are free to interact with your keyboard.
  • While tablets and smartphones are also compatible with WebEx Events Center, several of the features are limited, and most devices require the installation of the Cisco WebEx app.
  • Regardless of which device you plan to use, test its compatibility here. The link provides a quick test, and we strongly encourage you to do this before the webinar.
  • If your browser does not pass the test, contact Webex Technical Support at 1-877-669-1782 and tell them you will be attending an NIC webinar on NIC’s Webex site at http://nicmeetings.webex.com . They can help you troubleshoot connectivity issues.
  • NIC strongly recommends consulting with your agency/local IT , as you may encounter pop-up blocking and/or firewall issues that block the NIC Webex webinar url.


Click https://nicic.gov/webinar-vilt-readiness for further information on NIC’s live webinars, including (cost = free!), how to obtain training credit from your agency, and much more.

Reinvesting in Traffic Safety Post 2020

Law Enforcement agencies across the country are struggling with re-establishing a normal workflow following shutdowns and social distancing recommendations resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, people continue to die on the nation’s roadways. Many agencies, out of necessity, have restricted the activity of their traffic contacts. They are forced to limit action to only critical or blatant violations. 

As recovery and the measured reopening of states across the country progress, social unrest is erupting. This has taken scarce resources away from an already diminished focus on traffic safety. Agencies respond by adjusting to a “new normal” based on their community needs. 

If lives are to be saved, traffic safety must remain a priority in the day-to-day operations of law enforcement agencies. Prior LEL Webinars focused on implementing safe and effective traffic enforcement strategies in the post-COVID world. December’s webinar takes the next logical step by suggesting an approach to resuming education and enforcement efforts.

This traffic safety outreach initiative is offered in partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Presentation collaborators include Ohio State Patrol Colonel Ken Morckle (ret.), Nevada Highway Patrol Colonel John O’Rourke (ret.) and Winter Park Police Chief Brett Railey (ret.), senior public safety consultant for The Digital Decision Public Safety Team. These veteran law enforcement professionals present their perspectives on a logical plan for the return of a traffic safety focus into the daily operations of law enforcement agencies.

The program will emphasize the four most critical areas of enforcement that can have the greatest impact on traffic fatalities:

  • Prioritizing enforcement of DUI
  • Speed
  • Occupant restraint
  • Pedestrian and bicycle enforcement will save lives.  
​The ​Reinvesting in Traffic Safety, Post-2020 ​webinar ​is set for 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. December 9.
 
Register now.​

The Rarity of Deadly Force: The True But Largely Untold Story of Police Forgoing Deadly Force

In 2018, police made over 10.3 million arrests in the U.S. That same year, police killed 990 people. That’s less than one in 10,000.

Between 2011 and 2015, the number of people who had police contact ranged from 62.9 million to 53.5 million. Taking the lower number of contacts for an average, and using the number of deaths in 2018, that’s less than one in 54,000.​​

I favor transparency and a national database on police use of deadly force. I’m confident it will show the rarity of deadly force, and the greater rarity of the unjustified use of deadly force. (I understand that unjustifiable deadly force is not a statistic to the victim and their family.) Also, there is much to learn from deadly use of force incidents that could improve officer training and better educate the public.

THE FORGOING OF DEADLY FORCE

What about when police are justified in using deadly force but refrain from doing so? Surely there are valuable lessons there, too – for the profession and the public.

In an online search, I discovered Restraint in the Use of Deadly Force: A Preliminary Study. (“Restraint” in this study meant an officer forgoing deadly force, not the use of physical restraint.)

Written by four professionals with educations and careers in law enforcement, the preliminary study reflected the authors’ discussions over 30 years with thousands of police officers nation-wide while teaching, conducting research and consulting on cases regarding the use of force, including deadly.  

Based on their work and three publications resulting from it, in 2010, the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, awarded a grant to the authors for training law enforcement officers. Ten sites from across the nation were selected, and the training was offered to approximately 50 participants at each site.

During the training, 295 officers with an average of 17 years of police experience completed a confidential survey about their use of force and related issues. The survey revealed a notable pattern of officers forgoing the use of justified deadly force:

  • Officers in the sample were involved in 1,189 situations where deadly force was justified.
  • Officers fired their weapons in 87 of these incidents and refrained from firing in 1,102.

In other words, officers refrained from using justified deadly force 93% of the time.

MORE RESEARCH IS NEEDED

The authors asked,

“If officers risk their personal safety by using restraint in deadly force, why has this phenomenon largely gone unnoticed in the media and research? An analysis of research on the topic of deadly force yields no studies directly related to the use of restraint in deadly force by agents of law enforcement.”

They noted the limits of their preliminary study:

  • It didn’t delve into the inner psychology and perceptions of the officers in their decision to forgo deadly force.
  • The self-reported data from the officers wasn’t validated by objective reports.

And they offered suggestions for future research, such as:

  • What factors lead to officers forgoing deadly force?
  • Does the use of deadly force reduce or increase the inclination of officers to forgo deadly force in subsequent critical incidents?
  • How do individual officers perceive refraining from deadly force?

I asked one of the authors, Dr. Pinizzotto, if he was aware of any research in this area since he and his colleagues published their preliminary study. He wasn’t. My personal online search also found none.

Dr. Pinizzotto suggested agencies document circumstances where officers have drawn their firearms without firing when deadly force was justified. To that, I’d add instances where they have not drawn their firearms when deadly force was justified.

My esteemed Police1 colleague, Chief Joel Schultz, writing about how decisions to forgo force might inform training had a suggestion for how to gather such information:

The days of small departments relying on studies from large agencies with the resources to pay for research or attract grants may be waning. Many officers and administrators have advanced degrees that required using research methods. Collaboration with area colleges or a sharp intern can yield helpful guidance on creating a viable study.”

THE NEED FOR THE OTHER NARRATIVE

I don’t have expertise in research or survey design, but this is a narrative that needs to be told. In the absence of academicians taking this on, perhaps the profession needs to become more engaged in telling its own stories.

Chief Schultz provided a viable suggestion for gathering the relevant data. Then you must get it out. If you can get the ear of a Washington Post reporter or writer for The Atlantic Monthly or an investigative reporter with REVEAL – The Center for Investigative Reporting, challenge them to write about it. Consider contacting a local reporter. Of course, you’ll have to be willing to provide them information from your agency.

The profession can learn from incidents where officers forgo the use of deadly force. So, too, can the public. This true, but largely untold, story needs to be heard.  

ADD YOUR EXPERIENCE TO POLICE1’S INSTITUTIONAL KNOWLEDGE SURVEY

Police1 has created the Institutional Knowledge Project to create a repository of lessons learned around the handling of the situations LEOs face every day. Click here to share your experiences regarding the use of deadly force addressing these general areas:

If you have ever been in a situation where the use of deadly force would have been justified and you did not use deadly force, what led you to refrain from using deadly force? What did you do instead? What was the outcome? Was anyone injured? If so, please specify who (officer, suspect, bystander) was injured and how severely. Would you make the same choice if the same situation arose again?

Click here to participate.

 

By Val Van Brocklin | Police1.com

About the author
As a state and federal prosecutor, Val’s trial work was featured on ABC’S PRIMETIME LIVE, Discovery Channel’s Justice Files, in USA Today, The National Enquirer and REDBOOK. Described by Calibre Press as “the indisputable master of entertrainment,” Val is now an international law enforcement trainer and writer. She’s had hundreds of articles published online and in print. She appears in person and on TV, radio, and video productions. When she’s not working, Val can be found flying her airplane with her retriever, a shotgun, a fly rod, and high aspirations. Visit Val at www.valvanbrocklin.com and info@valvanbrocklin.com

Photo by Scott Olson | Getty Images

Too Fast For Conditions: A Conversation on Speeding

​J​oin the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) on Thursday, November 12 from ​2 to 3 p.m. Central Standard Time​ for a roundtable discussion on speeding trends during the pandemic, state and local efforts to address this issue, and the opportunities and challenges presented by automated speed enforcement. 

This webinar is sponsored by Redflex. 
 
Moderator: – Russ Martin, Senior Director of Policy and Government Relations, GHSA 
 
Sponsor Remarks: – Mark Talbot, CEO, 
 
Redflex Panel Discussion: 
– Jonlee Anderele, Ph.D, Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Region 5 
– Daniel Farley, Chief, Traffic Operations Deployment and Maintenance Section, Pennsylvania DOT 
– Jonathan Nelson, Assistant to the State Highway Safety and Traffic Engineer, Department of Highway Safety and Traffic, Missouri DOT  
 

Missouri Law Enforcement Required to Complete De-escalation and Implicit Bias Training

Starting next year all Missouri officers are required to take one hour each of de-escalation and implicit bias training annually to maintain their licenses.

Missouri Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft’s office approved the new training standards that require annual continuing education training.

The new training standards will be effective on January 1, 2021.

They were approved by the Missouri Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Commission on October 5.

“Our law enforcement officers take on extraordinary risks and make tremendous sacrifices to make Missouri safer,” Governor Mike Parson said. “These enhanced standards will help equip officers with relevant, up-to-date training to meet the challenges they face daily and facilitate better communication and interactions with the public.”

Missouri law enforcement officers must complete 24 hours of annual continuing education training to maintain their licenses.

The POST Commission’s action on October 5 required one hour each in de-escalation and implicit bias training be part of each officer’s 24 hours of annual training.

News from CRI-TAC The COPS Office Collaborative Reform Technical Assistance Center

Police officers wear protective masks while maintaining a road block on the bridge leading to a drive-through testing facility. Angus Mordant—Bloomberg/Getty Images

Protecting Our Law Enforcement Officers As They Serve The Community During A Pandemic​

As millions of Americans try to limit their exposure to the possibility of contracting COVID-19, there are certain groups that need to stay on the front lines, and law enforcement is one of those groups. While the predominant focus is on staying physically healthy, often overlooked is the mental toll faced by the officers and deputies, who are valiantly continuing to do their jobs in the face of a worldwide pandemic. To that end, CRI-TAC is offering two webinars that will focus on the mental health of law enforcement doing their jobs during this trying time:

Maintaining Morale During a Public Health Crisis Webinar

On October 19, 2020, the COPS Office Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC), in conjunction with CRI-TAC partners NSA and IACP, will host a webinar on what sheriffs and other law enforcement leaders can do to help maintain and improve morale among personnel – both sworn and civilian – during a crisis. Speakers will include Sheriff Garry McFadden, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. To register for the webinar, please visit https://sheriffs.org/CRITAC-StaffMorale-Webinar.

How to Prevent a Global Crisis from Becoming a Personal One: Stress Management in High-Stress Times Webinar

On October 27, 2020, the COPS Office CRI-TAC, in conjunction with CRI-TAC partners NSA, IACP, and FOP, will host a webinar on the mental health of officers during COVID-19. This webinar will offer realistic practices and tips for first responders and their families to help address and manage stressors during a pandemic. Speakers will include FOP National Director of Wellness Services Sherri Rowan, Dr. Kimberly Miller, and Metropolitan Nashville Police Manager David Kennington. To register for this webinar, please visit https://www.sheriffs.org/CRITAC-MentalHealth-Webinar.

Don’t Forget to Contribute to the COVID-19 Law Enforcement Impact Dashboard!

The National Police Foundation recently announced a real-time COVID-19 Law Enforcement Impact Dashboard to collect data and monitor workforce impacts, including the number of officers unable to work/placed in off-duty status due to possible or confirmed exposure, the number of officers that have been tested and diagnosed, and personal protective equipment (PPE) needs.

The NPF, IACP, and other CRI-TAC partners encourage law enforcement agencies to submit their data here: https://www.policefoundation.org/covid-19/. Data collected through the COVID-19 Law Enforcement Impact Dashboard will assist the field with understanding the scope and impact of COVID-19, as well as informing CRI-TAC tools and resources for the field.

New Offering Under CRI-TAC’s Menu of Technical Assistance

CRI-TAC is pleased to announce that its technical assistance offerings will now include the topic of “use of force.” In response to tremendous requests from the field, use of force will now join a number of other highly requested topics including community engagement, de-escalation, mass demonstration response, officer safety and wellness, and school safety. Technical assistance on use of force will include:

  • Offering training and awareness on best and promising practices, including offering peer-to-peer exchanges to share those practices
  • Reviewing and providing tailored guidance on an agency’s policies, procedures, and training
  • Training and guidance on how to conduct use of force investigations
  • Developing a calibrated use of force investigation process tailored to the type and size of the agency
  • Addressing how to handle complaints, as well as how to follow-up complaints to ensure investigations are safe, and accountable

Agencies can request more information by visiting CollaborativeReform.org or contacting TechnicalAssistance@usdoj.gov.

Peace Officer Standards and Training Commission to Meet, Discuss Survey Results

The Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Commission will meet on Monday, Oct. 5, at 1 p.m., for the first time since conducting surveys of both citizens and the public about law enforcement training in Missouri. More than 1,600 respondents took part in a survey of the public on their experiences with Missouri law enforcement and more than 450 law enforcement officers responded to a similar survey.

The meeting agenda includes a discussion of the surveys. The commissioners have previously held three public discussions of the comments received in the surveys and on their review of current training standards. This will be the first regular meeting at which action could be taken by the commission following those discussions.

The meeting agenda also calls for a presentation by Lincoln University on its application for preliminary approval for the university to pursue a license for a law enforcement basic training academy. Missouri currently has 19 licensed basic training academies. Lincoln University, located in Jefferson City, was founded in 1854 as the nation’s first degree-granting Historically Black College and University, or HBCU.

A livestream of the meeting audio will be available at (650) 479-3207. The Access Code is 133 000 1111.

Established by state statute, the POST Commission is responsible for the curriculum for law enforcement officer basic training and continuing education in Missouri. More information about the commission and Missouri’s Peace Officer Standards and Training Program is available here.

The Association between ACEs and Criminal Justice Involvement: Becoming Trauma Informed: An Essential Element for Justice Settings Webinar Series

Becoming Trauma Informed: An Essential Element for Justice Settings Webinar Series

This is a Series of three Webinars: These webinars will be recorded and made available on the NIC website. Each of the webinar events contain valuable information regarding trauma in justice-involved populations, but participation in each event in sequence is not required. Please note that registering for the first event scheduled for October 26, does not include registration for the two subsequent events; November 2 and November 9. A separate email will publicize that event, and a separate registration will be required for each webinar, as content will be different. Participants who are unable to log on for each event, can access the webinar recordings for all of the webinars in the series when posted.

Dates and Times:
The Association between ACEs and Criminal Justice Involvement: October 26, 2020
Trauma-Informed Treatment and Theory: November 2, 2020
Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive: November 9, 2020

Webinar Start Times (All Sessions):

10-11:15 am PT/ 11am-1:15pm MT/ 12-1:15pm CT/ 1-2:15 pm ET

Each session is 75 minutes.

Webinar Summary:
With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons.

While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives.

Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging.

The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  • Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  • Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  • Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Moderators/Speakers

Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.

Who Should Attend?
A wide audience can benefit from the webinar series including criminal justice officials, treatment program personnel, county and state mental health and social service professionals. The three-part program is also beneficial to existing treatment programs seeking to increase staff skills on gender-responsive and trauma-informed interventions in prisons, jails, and community corrections. Correctional staff may also benefit from the training to increase their understanding of the complex issues surrounding the supervision of incarcerated men and women with histories of trauma and abuse, as well as the potential effect of trauma on themselves.

How Do I Register?
Follow this link to register in NIC’s WebEx Event Center for webinar one 20C7506A:
https://nicmeetings.webex.com/nicmeetings/onstage/g.php?MTID=ef22d9e0edffcf5779f600ad49d8061d3

Stay tuned for future messages from NIC that reminds you of registration opportunities for webinar’s two and three scheduled for November 2 and November 9 respectively.

If you encounter difficulty in accessing the registration link, please work with your local / agency IT to see if local /agency firewall settings / pop-up blockers / security settings are preventing you from accessing NIC’s webinar URL (https://nicmeetings.webex.com) and/or the webinar registration link.

Who Do I Contact for More Information?

Content Contact
Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
mbuell@bop.gov

Webinar Technical Contact
Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
llemaster@bop.gov

How Do I Participate Effectively In a WebEx Event Center Webinar? How Do I Get Ready?
For the best experience in your next NIC WebEx Event Center webinar, you’ll need a hands-free telephone, headset or earbuds, and an internet-enabled computer. For optimum learning, be in a quiet place, free from distractions/interruptions, sight-and-sound separated from others, where you can concentrate on what is happening during the webinar. A separate office space with a door to close is an ideal setting. Connect to the webinar audio bridge via a hands-free telephone, using earbuds/headset connected to your phone/cell phone, so your hands are free to interact with your keyboard.

While tablets and smartphones are also compatible with WebEx Event Center, several of the features are limited, and most devices require that the Cisco WebEx app is installed. Regardless of which device you plan to use, test its compatibility here. This is a quick test, and we strongly encourage you to do this before the webinar. If your browser does not pass the test, contact WebEx Technical Support at 1-877-669-1782 and tell them you will be attending an NIC webinar on NIC’s WebEx site at http://nicmeetings.webex.com . They can help you troubleshoot connectivity issues.

NIC strongly recommends consulting with your agency/local IT , as you may encounter pop-up blocking and/or firewall issues that block the NIC WebEx webinar URL.

Click https://nicic.gov/webinar-vilt-readiness for further information on NIC’s live webinars, including the answers to many frequently asked questions such as “What is the cost of the webinar?” (Free!), “How do I obtain training credit from your agency?”, “Will the webinar be recorded?” (YES!!), “How do I get my computer system ready to access the webinar?” and much more!

Missouri Panel to Review Law Enforcement Survey

As Missouri’s commission in charge of the minimum standards for law enforcement training continues listening sessions this week to gather feedback about law enforcement, it’s not yet clear if or when the commission may make formal recommendations based on what it learns.

The Missouri Peace Officers Standards and Training Commission on Monday and Wednesday plans to publicly discuss the results of a survey of the public about law enforcement training requirements and discipline.

The listening sessions this week are virtual — as was one last week discussing feedback from a survey of law enforcement — and listeners can participate by phone or WebEx online.

Two phone lines for the virtual discussions have been set up to handle a total of up to 1,000 listeners, though comments during the sessions will have to be made to an email address to be provided at the beginning of each session, according to the Department of Public Safety.

The phone numbers and access codes for calling in to listen and the websites and event passwords for the WebEx option are available at dps.mo.gov/news/newsitem/uuid/f3ab4521-3424-4315-b832-f9b97d75f79c.

The listening sessions are scheduled to begin at 2 p.m. Monday and Wednesday.

The POST Commission’s duties and powers include establishing minimum standards for basic law enforcement training, setting the minimum number of hours for basic training, establishing continuing education requirements, establishing minimum standards for law enforcement training instructor; and advising the DPS director on law enforcement standards and training.

Widespread protests following the May death of George Floyd, a Black man, in Minneapolis under the knee of a white officer — and the legislative discussions across the country about police reform and accountability that followed — led the POST Commission to schedule surveys and listening sessions to hear what law enforcement and the public have to say about training and law enforcement in general.

The commission took no action last week in its discussion of responses from law enforcement — there were 468 survey responses from law enforcement — and it’s not likely the commission will take any formal action this week.

DPS spokesman Mike O’Connell said Friday: “The commission has said they plan to discuss what they’ve learned in the Oct. 5 POST Commission meeting but not that they would have formal recommendations (in October).”

O’Connell said no more listening sessions are planned beyond the ones this week.

He added while the commission has not said anything about the timing of any formal recommendations — such as whether they would have any by the end of the year — they have taken seriously a charge from Gov. Mike Parson to review law enforcement training in Missouri.

POST Commission and DPS to Discuss Response to Survey

​​The Missouri Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Commission and the Department of Public Safety today invited Missourians to listen in as commissioners discuss responses from law enforcement officers and citizens to two surveys on law enforcement training and discipline in Missouri.

On Wednesday, Aug. 26, at 2 p.m., POST commissioners will discuss responses from law enforcement officers to a survey of officers on law enforcement training requirements and discipline in Missouri. The survey was conducted from Aug. 17 to Aug. 24.

On Monday, Aug. 31 at 2 p.m., and on Wednesday, Sept. 2 at 2 p.m., POST commissioners will discuss responses from members of the public to a survey conducted from Aug. 18 to Aug. 26 on law enforcement training requirements and discipline in Missouri. Members of the public are encouraged to continue to participate in that survey through Aug. 26, 2020 at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LETraining_Public.

Two phone lines, each of which can handle up to 500 callers, are being provided to each of the listening sessions. A WebEx link is also being provided for those who would prefer to listen with a computer.  

Additional comments from the public may be offered by email during the listening sessions. An email address will be provided at the beginning of each listening session. There is no audio option to ask questions during the listening sessions.

Aug. 26 – Law Enforcement Survey Listening Session

LINE 1
Phone number: 650-479-3207
Access code: 133 961 8599
Web address for attendees: https://stateofmo.webex.com/stateofmo/onstage/g.php?MTID=e95c8bd32c8c3bfca85cacd7b3ae536e1
Event password: PWd7KE7HPZ3

LINE 2
Phone number: 650-479-3207
Access code: 133 212 6776
Web address for attendees: https://stateofmo.webex.com/stateofmo/onstage/g.php?MTID=ec3144d4b0c375f76c2a540d43e74a1d7
Event password: 7fQV6kwyKM4

Aug. 31 – Public Survey Listening Session

LINE 1
Phone number: 650-479-3207
Access code: 133 488 8026
Web address for attendees: https://stateofmo.webex.com/stateofmo/onstage/g.php?MTID=ee00ea5ce430b3e8f067d32dfba8133c5
Event password: rKQHgSaU242

LINE 2
Phone number: 650-479-3207
Access code: 133 924 4860
Web address for attendees: https://stateofmo.webex.com/stateofmo/onstage/g.php?MTID=efd219b7daa5e905424feb43f06f81d9c
Event password: SQnXFMqQ834

Sept. 2 – Public Survey Listening Session

LINE 1
Phone number: 650-479-3207
Access code: 133 643 4469
Web address for attendees: https://stateofmo.webex.com/stateofmo/onstage/g.php?MTID=ecf51c7646d28a34c0b925d68c2ca5930
Event password: Bfbqa2VYY32

LINE 2
Phone number: 650-479-3207
Access code: 133 884 0241
Web address for attendees: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LETraining_Public
Event password: vjMiqSkf976

Established by state statute, the POST Commission is responsible for the curriculum for law enforcement officer basic training and continuing education in Missouri. More information about the commission, Missouri’s Peace Officer Standards and Training Program and the disciplinary complaint process is available on the POST Program webpage.

In Missouri, law enforcement officers must complete 24 hours of continuing law enforcement education each year to maintain their peace officers licenses: 2 hours in Legal Studies; 2 hours in Technical Studies; 2 hours in Interpersonal Perspectives; 2 hours of Skill Development involving firearms; 16 hours of electives in any of the preceding core curriculum areas; and 1 hour of racial profiling awareness training.